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LUXURY HOTEL INSIDER
 
FSA LogoThe Luxury Hotel Insider: Exclusive luxury hotel deals, features and special rates from the luxury hotel experts at Five Star Alliance. 
 
Named one of Tripbase's Best Luxury Travel Blogs for 2011, below are Five Star Alliance's newest articles featuring exclusive information on luxury hotels worldwide including special offers and deals at the world's best hotels.

Announcing Four Seasons Ocean Residences (AKA Cruise Ship)

November 23, 2005
By: Mary Winston Nicklin

Four Seasons Cruise Ship

A permanent address that's an everchanging address… now that's a cool idea. Slated to launch in fall 2007, the ship will include 100 luxury apartments, with all the indulgent amenities for which Four Seasons is famous (spa, steam room, pool and cabanas, jogging track and fitness center, even… golf?) Grab a stake before they sell out. From $400,000 for a one-month timeshare for 50 years.

Via Travel and Leisure (flipping through the November issue)


What’s Up With the Burj Dubai?

November 23, 2005
By: Mary Winston Nicklin

Burj Dubai

"Throughout history, only a handful of structures have had the power to change history." The great pyramids, Empire State building, Eiffel Tower, and... the Burj Dubai? Pretty bold, if you ask me, but this development is being billed as "the most exclusive address in the world," not to mention the world's tallest building. This will be the site of the first of the Armani Hotels and Resorts, scheduled to open in 2008. Emaar Properties is supposedly investing $6 billion in its Burj Dubai project. Opposite the tower, The Old Town Island will feature residences, boutique offices, spa and retail outlets.


Jumeirah Wins Big at World Travel Awards

November 21, 2005
By: Mary Winston Nicklin

Madinat Jumeirah

At last week’s World Travel Awards, the Dubai-based luxury hospitality group was recognized as the “Middle East’s Leading Hotel Brand.” In addition, Jumeirah’s hotels in Dubai—the Burj al Arab, Madinat Jumeirah, The Arabian Resort, and Jumeirah Emirates Towers—received a bounty of accolades. The Burj Al Arab, Jumeriah’s flagship, was honored as the “World’s Leading Hotel,” not surprising for the hotel most often recognized as the world’s most luxurious. Madinat Jumeirah, The Arabian Resort, received four awards including Middle East’s Leading Resort and World’s Leading Conference Resort. Additionally, the Emirates Towers won two prestigious awards: World’s Leading Business Hotel and Dubai’s Leading Hotel. (Notably, last February Jumeirah’s business hotel launched the Chopard floor, an entire floor devoted to female business travelers.) Since its establishment in 1997, Jumeirah has won over 130 international travel and tourism awards. Starting in early 2006, Jumeirah will take over management of the Essex House in New York.

Burj al Arab, Official Site

Burj al Arab, Five Star Alliance

Madinat Jumeirah, The Arabian Resort, Official Site

Madinat Jumeirah, The Arabian Resort, Five Star Alliance

Jumeirah Emirates Towers, Official Site

Jumeirah Emirates Towers, Five Star Alliance


7 Star Hotels? What’s Up with the Hotel Rating System?

November 14, 2005
By: Mary Winston Nicklin

Burj al Arab

A recent article in The Guardian got me thinking about the hotel rating system—those hotels that strangely surpass five stars. The best-known example worldwide? Why the seven-star, sail-shaped Burj Al Arab takes that prize. Perched on its own island, its tower soaring above the skyline, the hotel is the landmark visible for all of Dubai. What’s so special about a pad here? Personalized butler service, a laptop and private fax in every suite, an underwater seafood restaurant (reached by a simulated three-minute submarine ride), and an 18th floor spa with sweeping views of the Arabian Sea. The price tag starts at $1,000 a night.

With such over-the-top perks at luxury hotels these days (personal iPods and PSPs, and all the good stuff I’ve recently blogged about), it’s no wonder that hotel PR departments are getting creative with their rating systems. After all, there is no global, standardized rating system. Sure, different tourist boards around the world have their own ratings, and Mobil and AAA are widely known, but a universal system? Nope.

That’s pretty bogus if you ask me. What should we do about it?


U.S. Embassy in Beijing Warns of Attacks in Four and Five Star Hotels in China

November 10, 2005
By: Mary Winston Nicklin

Devastating news about Al Qaeda’s suicide bombers attacking Jordan Hotels (the four- and five-star Radisson SAS, Days Inn and Grand Hyatt) yesterday. After these sickening acts of terrorism, the U.S. embassy in Beijing has issued warnings of attacks at four- and five-star hotels across China.


Spotlight on: the Kabul Serena, Afghanistan’s First Five-Star Hotel

November 9, 2005
By: Mary Winston Nicklin

Kabul Serena Hotel

I just heard about another controversial development project: the first five-star hotel opened yesterday in war-ravaged Kabul. The Kabul Serena luxury hotel offers 177 guestrooms, ranging in price from $250-$1,200 a night. Afghanistan’s capital is being revitalized by foreign aid and investment (and profits from the opium trade). Yet many argue that money invested in development projects—such as the city’s luxury hotel—should be aimed instead at projects to aid the poor. On the other side of the coin, the hotel is providing jobs for 360 Afghans (20% women) and is helping to promote economic growth and international tourism. The hotel itself—as explained by its developer—helps the national economy by accommodating those foreigners who will have a major impact on developing the economy. What are your thoughts?


The Latest Lunacy in Iraq: A Five Star Hotel in the Green Zone?

November 8, 2005
By: Mary Winston Nicklin

Both The Washington Post and The Independent UK have recently reported the impossible: the development of a five star, $85 million hotel in the heart of Baghdad. The 23-storey “opulent palace complex”—as described by the Independent—will be the first private investment in Iraq since the U.S.-led war. Not to mention: the tallest building in the capital. (Hmmm, could the target be made any more obvious?) The land is being donated by the Iraqi government, but the (foolish) private financing is being undertaken by an Iraqi businessman. The hotel will be located in the middle of the Green Zone (built to withstand mortar and rocket attack), and will take two years to build. There is a lot of controversy surrounding the project, because most citizens cannot enter the Green Zone, and the hotel would thus be serving only the foreign population. (The plush suites, business centers, conference rooms and golf range accessible to a select few foreigners.) This has got to be a joke. Would you book a room here? PS. Apparently, there’s another plan brewing- to turn Saddam Hussein's former Tikrit palaces into a themed tourist destination. Don't know about you, but I've always fantasized about vacationing at the former-residence of a war criminal...


New Over-the-Top Perks at Luxury Hotels

November 2, 2005
By: Mary Winston Nicklin

Jumping on the blog bandwagon, I’d like to highlight the interesting NYT piece about the ultra-lux perks recently employed by luxury hotels, in order to distinguish themselves and entice repeat customers. Notable extravagant examples include the Four Seasons Manhattan (where a $400,000 Maybach 62 and a $325,000 Rolls-Royce Phantom are parked out front for clients’ use), the Conrad Istanbul (which provides CD players and discs for guests to learn useful Turkish phrases) and the Loews Annapolis Hotel (where guest can “borrow” the hotel’s Labrador retriever, Luke.) Experienced any hotel perk that can top this list?!


The World… in Dubai

October 24, 2005
By: Mary Winston Nicklin

The World in Dubai

In the luxury resort market of Dubai, nothing surprises me. Home of the only 7 star hotel in the world (Burj Al Arab), the latest SKI? resort (as Gridskipper reports today about Ski Dubai), and the development of The World-- in miniature man-made islands shaped like the continents of the world. The US$1.8 billion project, expected to be complete by the end of 2005, consists of 250 to 300 private artificial islands divided into four categories—private homes, estate homes, dream resorts, and community islands. Hell, you could even buy a continent! The World is located four kilometers offshore from Jumeirah, close to The Palm Jumeirah and Burj Al Arab.